DMARC (Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting, and Conformance) is a tool that helps protect email domains from being used for spam or phishing. If you receive emails, here’s what you need to know about DMARC in simple terms.

Checking the Sender’s Domain

When you receive an email, DMARC checks the domain of the sender. This is the part of the email address after the ‘@’ symbol. For example, in the email address ‘[email protected]’, the domain is ‘example.com’.

If the domain is written in a non-English language, it needs to be converted into a format that can be understood by computers. This is similar to translating a word from one language to another.

Handling Different Types of Emails

Not all emails can be checked by DMARC. Here’s how DMARC typically handles different types of emails:

  • Emails with multiple ‘From’ fields: These emails are usually rejected because they don’t follow the standard email format.
  • Emails with multiple addresses in the ‘From’ field: These emails are usually rejected because they don’t follow the format of emails normally protected by DMARC.
  • Emails with no ‘From’ field: These emails are usually rejected because they don’t follow the standard email format.
  • Emails with a ‘From’ field that doesn’t contain a meaningful domain: These emails are usually ignored.

If an email has multiple valid domains in the ‘From’ field, DMARC checks each domain separately. If any of the checks fail, the strictest policy is applied. For example, if one domain’s policy is to quarantine (treat as suspicious) and another domain’s policy is to reject, the email will be rejected.

Remember, this is a simplified explanation. In reality, DMARC involves a lot of complex processes and technologies. But hopefully, this gives you a basic understanding of how DMARC works when you receive an email.

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